Experiment 15

09May09

experiment15

[Note: Footage and info are currently being edited. The image above is a screenshot taken from the experimental animation and will be replaced with video as soon as possible]

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Experiment 14

09May09

experiment14

[Note: Footage and info are currently being edited. The image above is a screenshot taken from the experimental animation and will be replaced with video as soon as possible]


Experiment 13

09May09

experiment13

[Note: Footage and info are currently being edited. The image above is a screenshot taken from the experimental animation and will be replaced with video as soon as possible]


Stratastencil

09May09

Javan Ivey is an animator and director noted for creating the stratastencil technique throughout motion and animation design communities online (I recommend you take a look at his work around his website, he has had me hypnotised!)

Here he explains what ‘stratastencil’ is, and offers his experiment to demonstrate the technique titled ‘My Paper Mind’ [link to quoted text can be found at Javan Ivey’s blog, here]

An experimental animation exploring the “Stratastencil” technique that I’ve devised. Inspired by the Stratacut technique, Stratastencil is an additive process. Stratacut removes material to reveal another layer, while this technique adds another layer while still showing the layer before it.

 

I was immediatley drawn to the technique, moreso of the paper’s physical properities which allowed the animator to compose his illusion of movement through cutting and cropping of multiple layers. It is a technique that can be easily manipulated, for instance, placing larger sized stencils outdoors and shooting via stop motion against a live environment, or having people interact with these stenciled animations in every frame, similar to Sony Bravia’s Play Doh commercial, found here. There must be plenty of ideas to choose from! Unfortunately, it is not the quickest way of working, unless you have a team of people assisting you, thus a team effort. Elliot Jokelson directed an advertisement for the Bannaroo music and arts festival using the stratatstencil technique:

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[Link to advertisement is here]

He worked with 30 people on the production of this video. If you don’t believe me, take a look at the making-of video and credits, here [Javan Ivey’s making-of video can be found here]

It did not deter me from attempting this technique, however, learning to ‘work within our means’ from the Robert Violet project at the beginning of the year, my use of repetition proved useful. The experiments will be shown in the following posts.


This was an advertisement for Radio Scotland in 1995, which drew my attention (Link to TVC: BBC Radio Scotland 1995 ):

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Despite advertising for radio, there was use of lines and etching in motion to assist the speech provided from a radio commentating on football. The lines collaborated well with sound; generating an atmosphere through what appeared to be ‘loosely’ composed shapes echoing the frequency of the voice, while the text subtitles what the commentator is saying. Upon viewing the video, I created a doodle that replicated the visual representation of sound waves. This eventually evolved into textual waves, a combination of both speech and the written word.

textwaves1

It would look quite appealing if this were to be produced in animation, but was nonetheless another sketch which hindered my progress, neither relevant to material.

Unfortunately, my focus by this point expanded moreso as my attempt to channel my aims and goals proved a challenge. But what I did learn from this advertisement is importance of connecting text, sound and visual together and not disregarding neither element vital to the production of motion.


For long, I have highlighted repetition and have never really delved into the topic, for what seems to have plagued my worked. It is clearly evident that repetition plays a key role in my explorations thus far (aside from the use of paper). Repetition can evoke interest in work if the arrangment of reoccurring forms, text, line and images are composed in such a way that lures the viewer to witness the complexity within these formations (see The Opt Art Angel).

As I look back at what I had constructed, I realised I was revealing the versatility of sheets of paper of the same form and constructing a pattern and rhythm of movement within. Could ‘repetition’ ease (in this case, quicken) the process of paper use in motion and gain more? Repetition in itself can become tedious but it is a matter of preparation and patience that counts. There is potential in use of


Experiment 12

06May09

experiment12

[Note: Footage and info are currently being edited. The image above is a screenshot taken from the experimental animation and will be replaced with video as soon as possible]